Learning Where You Live

Learning Where You Live

Flora Rose House offers Learning Where You Live (LWYL) courses each year facilitated by the House Professor-Dean, House Assistant Dean, and special guests. An initiative of the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, Learning Where You Live  courses are specially designed courses taught on North Campus and West Campus. They are small, seminar-style classes that are usually offered for one credit and graded on an S/U basis. They focus on building relationships, innovative teaching, and fascinating topics. Beginning fall 2020, all LWYL courses will be grouped under the subject code UNILWYL.

If you are interested in enrolling in any of the Rose House LWYL courses, email Rose House Asst. Dean Jeff Godowski at jpg278@cornell.edu

Fall 2021 - UNILWYL 1413: Restorative Leadership in Community

Class time:     Tuesdays, 5:30-7:00pm (90 minutes) 16 total contact hours.
Grade:         1-credit, S/U
Location:     Rose 126 Seminar Room

Course Description: (link to syllabus)
This course is offered to students living on West Campus who are interested in gaining the knowledge and skills necessary for becoming restorative leaders within their groups, organizations, and communities on campus. The course addresses the fundamental principles, behavioral theories, models, and skills of Restorative Practices, an emerging social science grounded in indigenous practices from around the world. The residentially based nature of the course allows students to explore the dynamics of human interaction within a diverse living and learning environment. The course focuses on building and improving awareness and skills about social relationships with the belief that students will use their skills and awareness to create social change, to build relationships proactively, to repair harm and resolve conflict, and to form a more equitable society through their participation in community. 

Through weekly discussions, students will have the opportunity to engage in critical reflection to explore the values, beliefs, and social identities that contribute to a realized sense of self. Through highly interactive classroom activities, students will learn how to lead effectively with the Social Discipline Window; build healthy, authentic relationships with others utilizing Affective Script Psychology, the Compass of Shame, and Tomkin’s Blueprint; make equitable decisions in community utilizing Fair Process; understand how to reach these goals using the RP Continuum; and apply the Continuum in their lives through a Social Justice and anti-oppression lens. Special emphasis will be placed on developing advanced group facilitation skills by demonstrating affective statements and questions, by leading proactive and responsive circles, and by practicing restorative problem-solving techniques.